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MONSANTO TRANSFERS COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY
TO AID UNIVERSITY EDUCATION


WASHINGTON, Nov. 15 - Monsanto Company has made available for distribution by the CACHE Corporation direct campus use of the FLOWTRAN computer process simulation system for teaching process design and analysis. Monsanto's action will reduce costs, save time and allow far greater usage of the system at universities.

Dr. Stanley Proctor, director of engineering technology, Monsanto Corporate Engineering Department, made the formal announcement during the 75th Diamond Jubilee Meeting of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

"Putting FLOWTRAN on campus will have a profound effect on the training of chemical engineers through the '80s," said Dr. Proctor. "Monsanto has reiterated its support of chemical engineering education."

CACHE is a non-profit organization of chemical engineering educators and industry professionals. Its purpose is to promote cooperation among universities, industry and government in the development and distribution of computer-related and technology-based educational aids for university chemical engineering departments.

The FLOWTRAN system is Monsanto's productivity tool, which automates steady-state chemical process design for the process engineer, enabling him to spend more time on the creative aspects of engineering. The system is used in a broad range of design activities from the conceptualization of new plants to process improvement studies on existing plants.

"As a result, plant designs are less expensive to build, should operate more efficiently and be easier to run," Dr. Proctor said.

Monsanto is a leader in process simulation technology in the chemical industry. The company started to develop the system in 1964, and within two years FLOWTRAN was released for general use within the company. From 1969-73, FLOWTRAN was made available on a service-bureau basis in the United States, and was used by more than 70 companies at 100 locations.

By 1983, the FLOWTRAN process simulation system had also been licensed to 10 customers in such diverse industries as petroleum, pharmaceuticals and detergents for use on their own computers.

Monsanto made the FLOWTRAN system available on a national computer network in late 1973 to universities for educational purposes. With the placement of FLOWTRAN directly on campus, universities will now be able to use the system on their own computers at a much lower cost, and will be able to let their students utilize the system more often. This directly addresses the problems of high costs of commercial computer centers and long-distance data communication charges.

The system has already been installed in locations such as the University of Michigan, the University of Utah and the University of Pennsylvania.

"In my view, Monsanto's contribution is one of the finest examples of industrial cooperation with and aid to universities," said Professor Warren Seider, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Pennsylvania.


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